Our Monthly Newsletter

November News Letter 2019

Happy November. This is the month for giving thanks and appreciate friends and family. I think fall or winter is finally arriving. Slow but sure. Pumpkins, leaves, hot chocolate, coats, boots, sweaters, mittens, scarves, etc. it doesn’t get better than this. November is a busy month: It is the ASPCA’s Adopt a Senior Pet Month, National Pet Diabetes Month, and Manatee Awareness Month November 3, is One Health Day, The 3rd to the 9th is National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week, the 28th is Thanksgiving Day. Lots going on. Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving. Pam

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

This is a disease that effects both cats and dogs. It is easily diagnosed by blood tests. Many older cats and dogs may have this disease. One of the main symptoms is increased thirst and urination.

Diabetes in Dogs: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic condition in which a deficiency of the hormone insulin impairs the body's ability to metabolize sugar. It is one of the most common endocrine (hormonal) diseases of dogs.

There are two types of diabetes mellitus in dogs. Type I DM occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin. This can be the result of destruction of the cells in the pancreas that normally produce insulin. This form does not produce enough insulin and requires insulin injections to control the disease. Type II DM occurs when enough insulin is produced but something interferes with its ability to be utilized by the body. Dogs nearly always (99%) have the type I variety.

Diabetes mellitus usually affects middle-aged to older dogs of either sex, however it is most common in female dogs (twice as common in females as in males). The peak age seen in dogs is 7 to 9 years. Juvenile-onset diabetes may occur in dogs less than 1 year of age. Any breed can be affected.

Signs to watch for: Increased thirst

Increased frequency of urination

Weight loss despite a good appetite

Sudden blindness

Lethargy

Poor body condition

If you notice any signs of the above in your cat or dog, it is important to see your veterinarian right away. Your veterinarian can do several tests to diagnose the problem. Early detection is important for treatment and care. Just like in humans, there is treatment and insulin designed for the pet.

Diabetes in Cats: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic condition in which a deficiency of the hormone insulin impairs the body's ability to metabolize sugar. It is one of the most common endocrine (hormonal) diseases in cats.

There are two types of diabetes mellitus. Type I DM occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin. This can be the result of destruction of the cells in the pancreas that normally produce insulin. This form is identified in approximately 50 to 70% of cats diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. This form does not produce enough insulin and requires insulin injections to control the disease. Type II DM occurs when enough insulin is produced but something interferes with its ability to be utilized by the body. This form is identified in approximately 30% of cats with diabetes mellitus. This type of diabetes is treated with dietary management, weight control and oral drugs.

Approximately 20% of cats can be "transient" diabetics. This means that after diagnosis with diabetes mellitus, they can have total resolution of their diabetic state months to years after diagnosis. This does not happen in dogs.

DM usually affects middle-aged to older cats of either sex, however it is most common in neutered male cats. The peak age seen in cats is 9 - 11 years. Juvenile-onset diabetes may occur in cats less than 1 year of age. Any breed can be affected.

Signs to watch for: Increased thirst

Increased frequency of urination

Weight loss despite a good appetite

Lethargy

Poor body condition

Weakness-especially in rear legs and can be associated with plantigrade stance (where hocks are lower

to the floor than normal

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